Short Stories All the Time

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... a few of my thoughts about 900, mostly contemporary, short stories.
Showing posts with label Fitzgerald. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fitzgerald. Show all posts

21 September, 2013

F. Scott Fitzgerald, "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz"

First published in 1922, this story is a scathing commentary on wealth. I probably won't read it again but I did enjoy it. "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz" is about 34 pages long and written in 3rd person POV.

LINKS:
Wikipedia page for "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz"

Orson Welles, 1945 adaptation, radio broadcast of "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz"

05 September, 2013

F. Scott Fitzgerald, "Bernice Bobs Her Hair"

First published in 1920 in The Saturday Evening Post, "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" pits two female cousins, Marjorie and Bernice, with peer pressure, gender roles, expectations and understanding the nuances of popularity and acceptance during a specific time in America inside upperclass society.

According to Matthew J. Bruccoli, editor of The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald states, "The story was based on the detailed memo Fitzgerald wrote his younger sister, Annabel, advising her how to achieve popularity with boys: 'Cultivate deliberate physical grace.'"

The story has a shifting POV and is told in past tense. The themes, for me, are that women are competitive for the attention of men, lack of confidence and assuredness leaves one vulnerable. And, possibly that expectations do not have to be fulfilled but it can help if one understands what they are and decides how to proceed.

I don't understand "that crazy Indian blood in Bernice" and "Indian women all just sat round and never said anything." Why does Fitzgerald throw that in there? I don't know anything about him as an individual.

FAVORITE SENTENCES:
"Another week," she answered, and stared at him as if to lunge at his next remark when it left his lips."

"People over forty can seldom be permanently convinced of anything. At eighteen our convictions are hills from which we look; at forty-five they are caves in which we hide."

"Misty waves were passing before Bernice's eyes, while Marjorie's face wore that rather hard expression that she used when slightly intoxicated undergraduates were making love to her."

LINKS:
article by Solomon Wakeling about racism in Fitzgerald's works
a blog about racism in Fitzgerald's works
another blog entry about Fitzgerald and racism